A Glass Half Full of Stuff to Read

Short Poems, Long Poems & Limericks

The Man Who Couldn't Stop Talking

There's an insect that's famous for being quite chatty

And if you could hear its small voice

It would drive you quite batty

But you can't unless it nests

In some person's ear

And then every poor sap

Will be able to hear

The rambling rascal

The talkative thug

That's simply known as -

The Chatterbox Bug

 

It happened to one man while out for a walk

And he wasn't a man

That liked much to talk

But the insect it hopped

Right into his ear

Warm and hairy it said

“I quite like it in here”

And from that moment on

He lost control of his tongue

He hadn't babbled as much

Since he was quite young

 

Though it was not the poor man

Who suffered the worst

But all those around him

With whom he'd converse

 

He could talk the hind legs off a donkey

He could talk the beak off a duck

He could talk and talk 'til your ears fell off

He could even talk the wheels off a truck

 

He could not button his pie hole

He could not zipper his lips

He could not put a sock in it

He could not shut up when he sipped

 

And he found he could talk while walking

He found he could talk on a run

He found he could even talk under the ocean

But he never found talking much fun

 

People would scream and cover their ears

Whenever he'd talk

It would be bring them to tears

But some scientists gathered

From a far away place

To find a solution

To plug the man's face

But nothing would work

To quiet his tune

So they attached to his face

With a special head brace

A miniature hot air balloon

 

It didn't take long

For the rubber to rise

As they asked him a question

To increase the balloon's size -

“Have you ever wondered

What it would be like to fly”

And as he floated away

They all waved goodbye

And the last thing they heard

“Was I do not like heights”

And the bug jumped right out of his ear.

 


 


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